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Five Takeaways: Plenty of Fingers to Point for another Close Loss

Five Takeaways: Plenty of Fingers to Point for another Close Loss

BOSTON — Pitt lost its second consecutive one-point game, falling 31-30 in overtime to Boston College on Saturday in one of the most improbable ways to finish a season-crippling loss, as Alex Kessman’s extra point attempt sailed wide right of the mark after Pitt had scored to draw near to the Eagles in overtime.

As was the case in Pitt’s one-point loss to NC State the week before, there were plenty of plays where Pitt’s narrow margin of defeat could have been overcome, both in overtime and in regulation.

Kessman could have hit the extra point — or either of the other two kicks he missed in the game that were shorter than his 58-yarder at the end of regulation.

Pitt could have gotten a break on even just one of two fumble calls that did not go the Panthers’ way on reviews just before Boston College scores.

Marquis Williams could have held on to a gift-wrapped interception. Jason Pinnock could have kept his feet instead of stumbling behind Zay Flowers as the BC receiver raced 77 yards to a score. The officials could have let John Morgan’s unbelievably soft roughing the passer call in the second quarter slide.

Pitt could have had a better play call on 4th and 5 in the fourth quarter than a left-running bootleg with a quarterback with a balky ankle. Kenny Pickett could have picked out a few more wide-open receivers that were running free in Boston College’s defense. About four times, Pitt’s receiving corps could have helped extend a drive by holding onto the football.

Chances are, just one of those things going right for Pitt instead of going wrong would have been the difference between losing and winning. And it’s tempting to rightfully point that out that Pitt was the victim of some tough breaks that played large in a one-point final.

But the overarching theme is that if Pitt had the kind of team it wants to have, the kind of team that it appeared to have on paper entering the 2020 season, and the kind of team it thought it had when Pitt’s players and coaches were chirping about falling in the national rankings after a 3-0 start to the season, games against the NC States and Boston Colleges of the world shouldn’t routinely be so close that those plays become the difference between winning and losing.

Either Pitt doesn’t have the players that many thought it did, or the scheme has now repeatedly let those players down.

AIR JURK

Pitt’s defense, even without Jaylen Twyman and Damarri Mathis and even missing Wendell Davis and Keyshon Camp and largely, Cam Bright, as they were on Saturday, has at least four players that figure to play football on Sundays, and maybe as many as a half dozen. The talent is there.

The scheme, which had been questionable throughout Pat Narduzzi’s tenure as Pitt’s head coach before finally coalescing into something resembling what he was able to accomplish at Michigan State, has collapsed once again.

Boston College does not have a prolific offense. They scored just 26 points against a flat-out terrible Duke team. They scored only 24 against Texas State and managed 22 in last week’s loss to North Carolina.

They scored 31 against Pitt NFL-bound group of defensive players, 24 of them in regulation, and frankly, it could have been more.

The Eagles offense is not complicated. They make a show of running the ball, but aren’t very good at it. They throw the ball a lot, but really only have two targets worth mentioning: wide receiver Flowers and tight end Hunter Long, who spent all night finding wide-open holes in Pitt’s secondary.

Flowers caught six passes for 162 yards and three touchdowns. Long had six more for 93 yards and several crucial first downs. Those are the only two meaningful weapons Boston College has. They move them around well. They attacked Pitt’s scheme well.

But at the end of the day, it’s two guys. This is not an offense with weapon after weapon that can beat a team any number of ways. The Eagles would probably beg other teams to give them the opportunity to get Flowers in one-on-one coverage and Pitt gave it to them all night long.

“I think it was just getting beaten physically and again, it comes down to your technique and fundamentals at the line,” Narduzzi said of the breakdowns against Flowers. “There was no coverage busts from my knowledge.”

For the second straight week, Pitt’s cornerbacks were the weak link in the defense, frequently allowing big plays against. But did the coverage scheme change? Nope.

Pitt was able to do some nice things in the pass rush and they largely stuffed the Eagles running game, but at the end of the day, that isn’t a team flush with offensive weapons on the other side of the ball. A team with two players that could possibly beat Pitt beat them over and over and over again.

Without a busted coverage — according to Narduzzi — Pitt allowed 358 passing yards and three touchdowns to a player making his fourth career start. That’s just not good enough.

GOING NOWHERE

That’s not to alleviate the offensive side of the ball from blame. In fact, anything but. As the Panthers scratched and clawed their way into the game in the fourth quarter and quarterback Kenny Pickett repeatedly putting his body on the line to move the chains, Pitt’s offensive play-calling was absolutely nonsensical.

The Panthers entered the game with the No. 3 statistical quarterback in the country in Pickett, who owned a 146 passer rating and averaged 8.7 yards per drop-back coming in.



Pitt’s rushing game, on the other hand, has been solidly mediocre. Top rusher Vincent Davis averaged 3.4 yards per carry and as a team, Pitt gained only 3.3 yards per rush.

Based on that four-game sample, it should have been abundantly clear that Pitt’s offense should be overwhelmingly leaning on Pickett and the passing game to move the chains.

Yet, when Pitt got the ball trailing by a field goal with 6:29 to play, the Panthers called three straight running plays before punting the ball back to Boston College.

Pitt’s offense as a whole rushed for 105 yards on 40 carries, a 2.6-yards-per carry average. Some of those were Pickett scrambles, as he ended up with 14 rushing attempts, but the fact that Pitt is averaging nearly four yards more when it passes than when it runs, and still is running over 45 percent of the time doesn’t make any sense.

Either they need to improve the running game, so that it becomes a viable way of moving the ball down the field, or they should abandon it.

KICKING THEMSELVES

All of that is to point out that the game should not have come down to needing Kessman to make a 58-yard field goal late in regulation, let alone the extra point to potentially send the game to a second overtime.

But once the game got there, Kessman certainly let his team down. Kessman is a senior with as much big-game experience as any kicker in the country, but his start to the 2020 season has been a near-disaster other than his record-breaking kick on Saturday.

He missed two more field goals on Saturday to drop his percentage on the season to 58.3%, which is 60th in the country. Simply put, that figure isn’t good enough for any kicker, let alone a senior and doesn’t even include his extra point miss.

Left-footed freshman Ben Sauls probably does not have the leg to hit the 58-yarder that Kessman did, so that makes the easier solution to figure out what is wrong with Kessman, and it sounds like that will be Narduzzi’s tact, as least for now.

“It’s a tough way to finish it up like that,” Narduzzi said. “And again, Kess got us to overtime. It’s disappointing, but that stuff that happens and he got us there.”

NOW WHAT?

I’m not sure I’ve seen a team react to a regular-season loss the way the Panthers did.

Losing this game and falling to 3-2 with Clemson, Miami and Notre Dame left on their schedule was absolutely devastating to Pitt’s chances of having any type of a successful season, and the players seem to know it.

Paris Ford, always one to wear his heart on his sleeve, stayed crouched near the ground with his helmet off for what seemed like eons after Kessman’s kick sailed wide right.

The Panthers were gutted, but it didn’t seem that they had let the emotions of their previous one-point loss to NC State creep into their play. In fact, several things that stood out in that loss were cleaned up. Pitt had fewer penalty yards, especially on defense

The challenge moving forward will be a bigger one. One gut-punch, one-point loss did not kill Pitt’s season. This one did. Keeping this team together and focused on team goals could become difficult.

“It hurts,” Jimmy Morrissey said. “It hurts a lot. Every time you lose, and especially this one on the road. I’m really proud of a lot of guys in that locker room. … You can’t let this loss beat you next week,”

Sandy Schall, Coldwell Banker
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Pat Adonizio
Pat Adonizio
16 days ago

Finding fault is easy; sometimes the other team is better. We’ve not beaten a team with more than 1 win, BC and NCS are better than our fan base believes them to be. College football is so topsy-turvy on any given day. Our weaknesses have been exposed: mediocre O-line and small corners, poor defensive technique on coverage lack of discipline and poor game management. Any time you score 29-30 points you should win, but our defense has given-up 0, 10, 20, 30 and 31 consecutive games.

James from Florida
James from Florida
16 days ago

Very good analysis, the administration is going to make a decision regarding the future of the coaching staff at seasons end.

We are into season 6 and quite frankly very little progress has been made from season 1 of the Narduzzi era.

Do you keep a coach that has a ceiling of 8 wins and a bottom of 5 wins with a losing bowl record over their tenure?

Program seems stagnant, time for a change or accept mediocrity year in and year out.

The Pitt administration has a decision to make.

Section 122
Section 122
16 days ago

We are looking real hard at a possible 3-4 win season right now.

It’s bad. Really bad.

Kevin
Kevin
16 days ago

Great article!!! Where is the safety help???? It’s not our DB’s fault!!!! Even NFL CBs can’t play man on every single play. For 6 years we have our safeties playing LBs. BC threw to 2 guys all day, and we knew it but didn’t adjust. Look at all the deep balls over the last 6 years, and the safeties are nowhere to be found. If Narduzzi wants to keep his job, he needs to get in the 2000s and stop putting safeties in LBs position.

Tom DiPasquale
Tom DiPasquale
16 days ago

Very good analysis Alan. The other play that absolutely blew my mind was Deslin Alexanders inability to hold on to Jurkovic on the QB sneak and allow him to fall into the end zone and score a touchdown. It’s was as inexcusable as Turner falling down on the one yard line last week. Well coached teams don’t accept that level of incompetence to continue. Just stupid. And quite frankly, Pickett—for all his “toughness” just took as dumb a sack as I’ve ever seen. Not good for a senior when plenty of receivers were actually open. Stay in the pocket and… Read more »

Kevin
Kevin
16 days ago
Reply to  Tom DiPasquale

Narduzzi limits his players from playing fast. He’s too old school. Get in this century!!! Watch Clemson, they spread the field and create mismatches. Not us, we bunch it up (run up the middle) and only throw outside or QB run. Our D is still in 1990, thinking we have to stop the run on every play. If Narduzzi doesn’t overhaul this coaching staff/scheme, he will be fired in 2 years.

local_troll
local_troll
16 days ago

Alan’s criticism of running the ball is misguided. If you are so pass heavy it makes it harder to throw the ball. Patterns get recognized faster by the secondary and the defensive line is getting down hill faster.

The problem our fan base does not acknowledge is that other teams are talented too. We are talented but our number twos are young.

Some times I feel like the media in this town wants to get coaching staffs fired so they can write about some
Thing.

Def a heart breaking loss and some valid points Alan.

Terrence Otoole
Terrence Otoole
15 days ago
Reply to  local_troll

It’s yr 6 dude and we cant beat boston college 2 yrs in a row and barely beat a 6-6 mac team in our bowl game last yr ,i would hope our expectations should be higher than that ,but go ahead keep making excuses and pounding your chest how this is not narduzxi’s fault

Terrence Otoole
Terrence Otoole
15 days ago
Reply to  local_troll

Keep using we’re young excuse too ,I’ve heard that before too

Pat Adonizio
Pat Adonizio
15 days ago
Reply to  local_troll

Agree with your assessment of media, but add the fan-base to a degree. We had a solid coach in PC, but never showed support. He had a philoshy and plan that he adhered to, and Nardi benefitted with the O line and RBs; and had we made an effort to keep him and he stayed we’d be in a better place. Perhaps we wouldn’t have been able to hold onto him but it was certainly worth the effort.

Frank James
Frank James
15 days ago

Duzz is awful, but how does Salem have a job? No TE ever in this offense and he can’t recruit one.
Duzz has to go. 6 years in enough, unless fans are happy with 5-6 wins every year.
Hire anyone from the OSU staff.

Terrence Otoole
Terrence Otoole
15 days ago
Reply to  Frank James

Couldnt agree more frank ,this isnt yr 2 it’s yr 6 and we’re a mess

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